The Music of Nature

Writing in 1878, author JAMES M. TROTTER, in his essay 'The Music of Nature,' observed what 'the great Author of harmony' had wrought in the natural world.
by David McGee
 

 
 

Written In the Land

Archaeologists have uncovered evidence of over 25,000 years of Aboriginal occupation within this area, and Kakadu's rock art (gunbim) represents the longest historical record of any group of people in the world
by David McGee
 

 

 

A Walk Along Iceland’s Volcanic Rift

WALKING THE VOLCANIC RIFT: Iceland is literally tearing apart at a rate of one inch per year, separating the North American tectonic plate from the European plate and creating unparalleled landscapes.
by David McGee
 

 
 

The Music of Nature

From his outstanding 1878 book MUSIC AND SOME HIGHLY MUSICAL PEOPLE, the distinguished African-American author JAMES M. TROTTER exults in 'the music of Nature'
by David McGee
 

 

 

Spring in Verse

Spring cannot arrive too soon, and we anticipate its arrival in verse from SHAKESPEARE, EMILY DICKINSON, WILLIAM WORDSWORTH and other, and in song from MARK O'CONNOR, VIVALDI et al.
by David McGee
 

 
 

Winter in Verse

Shakespeare, Keats, Robert Burns, Thomas Campion and Robert Frost reflect on the modds of winter. Plus seasonal-oriented cartoons starring Mickey Mouse and friends and Woody Woodpecker. Bing Crosby makes an appearance too.
by David McGee
 

 

 

Letter to a Friend

In 1868, JOHN MUIR, then a University of Wisconsin student, wrote to his 'spiritual mother' to tell her of his recent travels and his growing devotion to a joyous and reverent communion with Nature.
by David McGee
 

 
 

Doubtful Lake

NATURES TEMPLE: One of the great women of 20th Century American letters chronicles her extraordinary hike in 1918 from Doubtful Lake to the Cascade Mountains. From her book Tenting To-Night.
by David McGee
 

 

 

TO AUTUMN

Celebrating the beauty and complexity of Autumn with a little help from our friend JOHN KEATS...
by David McGee
 

 
 

The Edge of Winter

The Edge of Winter: Welcoming a new season in Yellowstone.
by David McGee
 

 

 

‘Grass Is the Forgiveness of Nature—Her Constant Benediction’

In 1872 Kansas Sen. JOHN JAMES INGALLS, one of the U.S. Senate's most eloquent voices, praised the vitality of the tallgrass prairie in IN PRAISE OF BLUEGRASS--and he wasn't talking music.
by David McGee
 

 
 

Natural Comfort

When she got lost in ALLEGANY STATE PARK as a child, KIMBERLY DANIELS found unexpected comfort in the natural world.
by David McGee